The New York Times surveys swing state voters who regret supporting Biden in 2020

The New York Times spoke with a number of swing state voters who explained why they might vote for former President Trump over President Biden in 2024, even if they don’t like him. man himself.

“Biggest mistake of my life,” Frederick Westbrook, a former Biden voter and Las Vegas retiree, told the Times. Westbrook began driving for Lyft to supplement his retirement income, the Times reported.

“As a black man in America, I felt like he was doing unfair things,” he said of Trump. “He has a big mouth, he’s not a nice person.”

“It’s all about the economy,” Westbrook continued. “I don’t really trust Donald Trump. I just think housing, food, my car, my insurance, every element of life has increased.”

The Times article — written by Claire Cain Miller, Bianca Pallaro and Ruth Igielnik — reports a survey of influential voters: “…14% of respondents who said they voted for him in 2020 – voters like Mr. Westbrook who now say they will support Mr. Trump or a third-party candidate, or are undecided or will not vote. »

The article also mentions that while abortion remains a key issue, others such as “inflation, immigration and foreign policy” make them dissatisfied with Biden’s leadership.

While many voters who supported Biden in 2020 worry about abortion access, other issues like inflation and border chaos have come to the forefront. (PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP via Getty Images)

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Another voter, Veterans Affairs adviser Christopher Sheffield, 61, said he would support Trump despite his personal reservations because he believes the former president can prevent the next world war.

“I’m African-American — of course I worry about racism,” said Sheffield, who lives in Georgia. “But guess what? I’ve been experiencing this my whole life.”

While he says Biden is a “good guy,” he thinks the president “looks weak.”

“With North Korea and Putin and all these boys ready to act, I think they will be a little more reluctant to challenge Trump than they would be with Biden,” he added.

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In contrast, Jaredd Johnson, 25, said he had turned away from world affairs: “Our conversations are suddenly less about what’s happening abroad and more about how we’re struggling here, too.”

Biden and Trump

Trump has repeatedly made headlines for running a campaign against Biden. (Biden photo by Celal Gunes/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images and Trump photo Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Virginia Faris, a 54-year-old mother of four adult children struggling with the economy, denounced “Biden’s excessive spending and money printing policies.”

Amelia Earwood, 47, who works at the U.S. Postal Service in Georgia, expressed frustration with illegal immigration and inflation.

“All of our core values ​​are gone, and I’m just not happy at all.”

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While she called Trump a “horrible human being,” she said she “votes on his policies” and believes he can “turn this country around, whereas Biden has made a huge mess of it.”

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